My December Article For Oasis Magazine, Magnesium!

By Maha Blakeway

What do sugar, hypertension,

avocados, tahini, pine nuts, and bone

health have in common?

Most of us will associate bone health

with the mineral calcium. However,

calcium is not the only essential

mineral for your bone health.

Magnesium is not only crucial to

your bones, but it’s just as important

for your overall health. Magnesium

consumption has declined sharply

over the last century, mainly due

to large-scale farming and soil

depletion. In addition, the typical

acidifying Western diet, high in

SUGAR and processed food, actively

depletes magnesium in the

body. According to a study published

in The Clinical Biochemist Reviews,

Refining or processing of food may

deplete magnesium content by

nearly 85%. Furthermore, cooking,

especially boiling of magnesiumrich

foods will result in a significant

loss of magnesium.” Also, a high

intake of sugar increases magnesium

secretion in the urine.

Magnesium is so vital that a lack of

it can produce symptoms that mimic

serious illnesses and can cause

serious health conditions. Most

population suffers from insufficient

levels of it.

Unfortunately, this deficiency almost

always remains undiagnosed.

Determining whether or not you

have a deficiency can be difficult

for several reasons. Blood tests fail

because 99% of the magnesium in

your body is not found in your blood;

it’s found in your bones and muscles,

particularly your heart muscle. There

are some advanced Nutritional

serum tests that can be done in

specific labs, but they are usually

quite costly, and may not be covered

by your health insurance.

Yet another complicating issue is

the rate of magnesium absorption.

It varies significantly from one day

to the next, with absorption rates

ranging from 24 to 85%. Vitamin

D levels, digestive health, protein

ingestion, and calcium levels all

affect the uptake of magnesium in

the body. Fluoride ingestion is yet

another influential factor – fluoride

competes with magnesium for

absorption into the bones, because

they are absorbed along the same

biological pathway, so if you live in an

area where there is water fluoridation

happening to your drinking water,

then you need to be wary of your

magnesium levels and balancing the

2 minerals.

Here are some signs & ailments that

are related to Magnesium deficiency.

Knowing some key symptoms is an

important step in understanding

your own personal magnesium

needs.

• Anxiety

• Confusion/Poor memory

• Nausea

• Fatigue

• Hypertension

• Muscle twitches, weakness, and pain

• Sensitivity to sound and light

• Irritability

• Difficulty sleeping

• Fibromyalgia

• Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

• Restless leg syndrome

Magnesium is involved in hundreds

of metabolic processes, which

accounts in part for the wide range

of deficiency symptoms.

The Sources of Magnesium

You should eat plenty of magnesiumrich

foods such as leafy greens,

pine nuts, avocados, sesame paste

or tahini, peas, broccoli, cabbage,

green beans, artichokes, asparagus,

brussels sprouts, seafood like salmon,

tuna, mackerel, legumes. You can

supplement it with 400 mg of amino

acid chelated magnesium, as it’s the

most bioavailable form of this mineral.

Magnesium Chloride, Clycinate,

Malate, Sulfate and Citrate are all

good form too, as they each have

different therapeutic properties and

absorption rates, depending on your

needs, your health care practitioner

should be able to guide you.

Magnesium oil is easily absorbed

and one of my favorites. With any

supplements, you need to look for

a good quality one that is excipient

free. Don’t worry too much about

overdosing; any running stool would

be the first sign of overdoing it. A

daily Epsom salt bath or swimming

in the sea is another good option

for replenishing Magnesium in the

body.

Maha Blakeway, Naturopath BA, ND,

mCMA. For more articles related to

bone health, please visit her website @

http://www.mahashouse.com

Magnesium

December 18 / January 19 CSA 9

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